Therapies

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a form of psychotherapy that treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. Unlike traditional Freudian psychoanalysis, which probes childhood wounds to get at the root causes of conflict, CBT focuses on solutions, encouraging patients to challenge distorted cognitions and change destructive patterns of behavior.

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR)

is a fairly new, non-traditional type of psychotherapy with a strong evidence base. It’s growing in popularity, particularly for treating trauma from distressing childhood events to post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).   In EMDR, the therapist uses eye movements or rhythmic tapping with the client. These swift eye movements or tapping movements are said to loosen knots in the person’s memory and allow negative thoughts and distressing memories to be favourably reprocessed with minimal guidance from the therapist. Some have thought the process is similar to REM sleep, where eye movements accompany the digestion of daytime memories. 

Schema Therapy

(or more properly, Schema-Focused Cognitive Therapy) is an integrative approach to treatment that combines the best aspects of cognitive-behavioral, experiential, interpersonal and psychoanalytic therapies into one unified model. Schema-Focused Therapy has shown remarkable results in helping people to change negative (“maladaptive”) patterns which they have lived with for a long time, even when other methods and efforts they have tried before have been largely unsuccessful.

The Schema-Focused model was developed by Dr. Jeff Young, who originally worked closely with Dr. Aaron Beck, the founder of Cognitive Therapy. While treating clients at the Center for Cognitive Therapy at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Young and his colleagues identified a segment of people who had difficulty in benefiting from the standard approach. He discovered that these people typically had long-standing patterns or themes in thinking, feeling and behaving/coping that required a different means of intervention. Dr. Young’s attention turned to ways of helping patients to address and modify these deeper patterns or themes, also known as “schemas” or “lifetraps.”

 

What is Mindfulness?

Mindfulness is the basic human ability to be fully present, aware of where we are and what we’re doing, and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us.  Mindfulness is a state of active, open attention on the present.  When you’re mindful, you observe your thoughts and feelings from a distance, without judging them good or bad. Instead of letting your life pass you by, mindfulness means living in the moment and awakening to experience

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

is a type of psychotherapy that helps you accept the difficulties that come with life.  Categorically speaking, ACT is a form of mindfulness based therapy, theorizing that greater well-being can be attained by overcoming negative thoughts and feelings. Essentially, ACT looks at your character traits, values and behaviors to assist you in reducing avoidance coping styles. ACT also addresses your commitment to making changes, and what to do about it when you can’t stick to your goals.

ACT focuses on 3 areas:

Accept your reactions and be present
Choose a valued direction
Take action.

Hypnotherapy

Hypnosis is technique that works by altering our state of consciousness in such a way that the analytical left-hand side of the brain is turned off, while the non-analytical right-hand side is made more alert. The conscious control of the mind is inhibited, and the subconscious mind awoken.   Hypnosis is a technique for putting someone (or yourself) into a state of concentration where you are more suggestible and thus more open to messages about breaking bad habits or changing in other positive ways

think feel thrive

We're here to help